pizza:

vegbitch:

tonystarktrek:

thejollity:

FUN FACT!
Do you ever wonder why your lips and tongue sting a little when you’re eating pineapples? It’s because pineapples possess the enzyme bromelain, which breaks down meat proteins. 
Basically, when you eat pineapples, pineapples eat you right back.

Pineapples are so metal.

That explains a lot

I KNEW IT. IVE ALWAYS KNOWN PINEAPPLES WERE SUSPICIOUS AND I DIDN’T TRUST THEM. NO LOOK. THE PINEAPPLES ARE EATING US. WAKE UP PEOPLE. PINEAPPLES ARE DANGEROUS.

pizza:

vegbitch:

tonystarktrek:

thejollity:

FUN FACT!

Do you ever wonder why your lips and tongue sting a little when you’re eating pineapples? It’s because pineapples possess the enzyme bromelain, which breaks down meat proteins. 

Basically, when you eat pineapples, pineapples eat you right back.

Pineapples are so metal.

That explains a lot

I KNEW IT. IVE ALWAYS KNOWN PINEAPPLES WERE SUSPICIOUS AND I DIDN’T TRUST THEM. NO LOOK. THE PINEAPPLES ARE EATING US. WAKE UP PEOPLE. PINEAPPLES ARE DANGEROUS.

geekygothgirl:

jmiah0192:

Japanese child actress Mana Ashida (little Mako) was embarrassed that she couldn’t pronounce Guillermo Del Toro’s name so he gave her special permission to call him “Totoro-san” instead.
My Neighbor Guillermo Del Toro.

If I don’t reblog this, assume I’m dead.

geekygothgirl:

jmiah0192:

Japanese child actress Mana Ashida (little Mako) was embarrassed that she couldn’t pronounce Guillermo Del Toro’s name so he gave her special permission to call him “Totoro-san” instead.

My Neighbor Guillermo Del Toro.

If I don’t reblog this, assume I’m dead.

wcjobber:

sharkchunks:

metal-rican:

ghostoflalonde:

So uhh, my clothing dye ate through my gloves…..

+3 spellcasting +1 summoning EFF: 2XDAM vs undead

The tattoo makes it more demonic than undead.

So Now You’re a Necromancer: Beginner’s Guide.

wcjobber:

sharkchunks:

metal-rican:

ghostoflalonde:

So uhh, my clothing dye ate through my gloves…..

+3 spellcasting +1 summoning EFF: 2XDAM vs undead

The tattoo makes it more demonic than undead.

So Now You’re a Necromancer: Beginner’s Guide.

(Fuente: leggerabrezza)

File under:
#hp
Gryffindor: Do what is right
Ravenclaw: Do what is wise
Hufflepuff: Do what is nice
Slytherin: Do what is necessary
thinkmexican:

Paloma Noyola: The Face of Mexico’s Unleashed Potential
When a report emerged in September 2012 that a girl from one of Matamoros’ poorest neighborhoods had attained the highest math score in Mexico, some doubted its veracity. It must be fake, they said.
But it wasn’t fake. Her name is Paloma Noyola, and what most reports failed to mention is that almost all of her classmates also scored very high on the national math test. 10 scored in the 99.99% percentile.
Paloma and her classmates also scored in the top percentile in language. Something special was happening at José Urbina López primary school in Matamoros, and Wired went to take a look.
The high test scores turned out to be the work of a young teacher who also came from humble beginnings. Sergio Juárez Correa was tired of the monotony of teaching out of a book and wanted to try something new to help engage his students when he came across the work of Sugata Mitra, a UK university professor who had innovated a new pedagogy he called SOLE, or self organized learning environments. The new approach paid off.
Although SOLE usually relies on unfettered Internet access for research, Juárez and his students had very limited access. Somehow, he still found a way to apply Mitra’s teachings and unleash their potential.
From the beginning, Paloma’s exceptional abilities were evident:

One day Juárez Correa went to his whiteboard and wrote “1 = 1.00.” Normally, at this point, he would start explaining the concept of fractions and decimals. Instead he just wrote “½ = ?” and “¼ = ?”
“Think about that for a second,” he said, and walked out of the room.
While the kids murmured, Juárez went to the school cafeteria, where children could buy breakfast and lunch for small change. He borrowed about 10 pesos in coins, worth about 75 cents, and walked back to his classroom, where he distributed a peso’s worth of coins to each table. He noticed that Paloma had already written .50 and .25 on a piece of paper.

As Mr. Juárez implemented more of Mitra’s teachings in his classroom, Paloma continued to stand out as an exceptionally gifted student:

Juárez Correa was impressed. But he was even more intrigued by Paloma. During these experiments, he noticed that she almost always came up with the answer immediately. Sometimes she explained things to her tablemates, other times she kept the answer to herself. Nobody had told him that she had an unusual gift. Yet even when he gave the class difficult questions, she quickly jotted down the answers. To test her limits, he challenged the class with a problem he was sure would stump her. He told the story of Carl Friedrich Gauss, the famous German mathematician, who was born in 1777.
When Gauss was a schoolboy, one of his teachers asked the class to add up every number between 1 and 100. It was supposed to take an hour, but Gauss had the answer almost instantly.
“Does anyone know how he did this?” Juárez Correa asked.
A few students started trying to add up the numbers and soon realized it would take a long time. Paloma, working with her group, carefully wrote out a few sequences and looked at them for a moment. Then she raised her hand.
“The answer is 5,050,” she said. “There are 50 pairs of 101.”
Juárez Correa felt a chill. He’d never encountered a student with so much innate ability. He squatted next to her and asked why she hadn’t expressed much interest in math in the past, since she was clearly good at it.
“Because no one made it this interesting,” she said.

Although this Wired piece focuses mostly on Sugata Mitra, it does once again highlight the story of Paloma Noyola. Unfortunately, after a brief spurt of media attention, little on Paloma was ever mentioned and, as was pointed out by Wired, nothing was ever said of Mr. Juárez.
As with most stories in the Mexican press — and those popular with the middle-class — things suddenly become very important once it’s featured in a gringo publication. Which is a very sad commentary. We hope, however, that this story pushes those in the press, state and federal government to look not to the United States for validation but to Mexicans like Sergio Juárez doing good work in places like Matamoros.
The clear message in this story is that there are thousands of Paloma Noyolas going to school in Mexico who, just like her at one time, are not being challenged and therefore aren’t very interested in school. This story can, if we want it to, raise enough awareness to shift the discussion from poverty to opportunity.
Paloma truly personifies both Mexico’s challenges and unleashed potential.
Read the entire Wired story here: How a Radical New Teaching Method Could Unleash a Generation of Geniuses
Editor’s note: As an addendum, Wired provided information on helping support Sugata Mitra and his School in the Clouds project, and although they donated school supplies and equipment to José Urbina López School, we’re interested in seeing if we can help set up a similar fund for Sergio Juárez, the teacher featured in this story.
Also, $9,300 was raised to help fund Paloma’s education last year. We’re going to follow up with the economist who led the fundraising campaign to see how she’s doing. Stay tuned for the updates.
Stay Connected: Twitter | Facebook

thinkmexican:

Paloma Noyola: The Face of Mexico’s Unleashed Potential

When a report emerged in September 2012 that a girl from one of Matamoros’ poorest neighborhoods had attained the highest math score in Mexico, some doubted its veracity. It must be fake, they said.

But it wasn’t fake. Her name is Paloma Noyola, and what most reports failed to mention is that almost all of her classmates also scored very high on the national math test. 10 scored in the 99.99% percentile.

Paloma and her classmates also scored in the top percentile in language. Something special was happening at José Urbina López primary school in Matamoros, and Wired went to take a look.

The high test scores turned out to be the work of a young teacher who also came from humble beginnings. Sergio Juárez Correa was tired of the monotony of teaching out of a book and wanted to try something new to help engage his students when he came across the work of Sugata Mitra, a UK university professor who had innovated a new pedagogy he called SOLE, or self organized learning environments. The new approach paid off.

Although SOLE usually relies on unfettered Internet access for research, Juárez and his students had very limited access. Somehow, he still found a way to apply Mitra’s teachings and unleash their potential.

From the beginning, Paloma’s exceptional abilities were evident:

One day Juárez Correa went to his whiteboard and wrote “1 = 1.00.” Normally, at this point, he would start explaining the concept of fractions and decimals. Instead he just wrote “½ = ?” and “¼ = ?”

“Think about that for a second,” he said, and walked out of the room.

While the kids murmured, Juárez went to the school cafeteria, where children could buy breakfast and lunch for small change. He borrowed about 10 pesos in coins, worth about 75 cents, and walked back to his classroom, where he distributed a peso’s worth of coins to each table. He noticed that Paloma had already written .50 and .25 on a piece of paper.

As Mr. Juárez implemented more of Mitra’s teachings in his classroom, Paloma continued to stand out as an exceptionally gifted student:

Juárez Correa was impressed. But he was even more intrigued by Paloma. During these experiments, he noticed that she almost always came up with the answer immediately. Sometimes she explained things to her tablemates, other times she kept the answer to herself. Nobody had told him that she had an unusual gift. Yet even when he gave the class difficult questions, she quickly jotted down the answers. To test her limits, he challenged the class with a problem he was sure would stump her. He told the story of Carl Friedrich Gauss, the famous German mathematician, who was born in 1777.

When Gauss was a schoolboy, one of his teachers asked the class to add up every number between 1 and 100. It was supposed to take an hour, but Gauss had the answer almost instantly.

“Does anyone know how he did this?” Juárez Correa asked.

A few students started trying to add up the numbers and soon realized it would take a long time. Paloma, working with her group, carefully wrote out a few sequences and looked at them for a moment. Then she raised her hand.

“The answer is 5,050,” she said. “There are 50 pairs of 101.”

Juárez Correa felt a chill. He’d never encountered a student with so much innate ability. He squatted next to her and asked why she hadn’t expressed much interest in math in the past, since she was clearly good at it.

“Because no one made it this interesting,” she said.

Although this Wired piece focuses mostly on Sugata Mitra, it does once again highlight the story of Paloma Noyola. Unfortunately, after a brief spurt of media attention, little on Paloma was ever mentioned and, as was pointed out by Wired, nothing was ever said of Mr. Juárez.

As with most stories in the Mexican press — and those popular with the middle-class — things suddenly become very important once it’s featured in a gringo publication. Which is a very sad commentary. We hope, however, that this story pushes those in the press, state and federal government to look not to the United States for validation but to Mexicans like Sergio Juárez doing good work in places like Matamoros.

The clear message in this story is that there are thousands of Paloma Noyolas going to school in Mexico who, just like her at one time, are not being challenged and therefore aren’t very interested in school. This story can, if we want it to, raise enough awareness to shift the discussion from poverty to opportunity.

Paloma truly personifies both Mexico’s challenges and unleashed potential.

Read the entire Wired story here: How a Radical New Teaching Method Could Unleash a Generation of Geniuses

Editor’s note: As an addendum, Wired provided information on helping support Sugata Mitra and his School in the Clouds project, and although they donated school supplies and equipment to José Urbina López School, we’re interested in seeing if we can help set up a similar fund for Sergio Juárez, the teacher featured in this story.

Also, $9,300 was raised to help fund Paloma’s education last year. We’re going to follow up with the economist who led the fundraising campaign to see how she’s doing. Stay tuned for the updates.

Stay Connected: Twitter | Facebook

chibird:

The more you say it, the more you believe it. The more you believe it, the truer it will become as you strengthen yourself and your confidence!

chibird:

The more you say it, the more you believe it. The more you believe it, the truer it will become as you strengthen yourself and your confidence!

00davo:

astound:

SO HARD NOT TO DANCE WHEN YOU HAVE EARPHONES ON WALKING BY YOURSELF

thefingerfuckingfemalefury:

neverrwhere:

shazrolane:

desert-neon:

bumblegabe:

Help me prove a point

I have never reblogged anything faster.

Unfortunate for the books, but speaks loads about the quality of some fan fics

You have no idea how many

HELL YES I HAVE <3

File under:
#queued
logic-and-love:

I want this on a shirt

logic-and-love:

I want this on a shirt

(Fuente: slimgiltsoul)

instagram:

How I Shoot: Horses with @lindalaughs

How I Shoot is a series where we ask Instagrammers to tell us about their photo-taking process. This week, @lindalaughs shares her tips for taking photos of horses.

“Horses are very honest and pure. They have a calming effect on me. They respond to feelings,” says Instagrammer Linda Heidema (@lindalaughs), who likes to convey human emotions and expressions through her photos of horses.

Once a week, Linda gets four hours away from her hectic life as a mother and youth justice officer in Groningen, Holland, and drives out to the countryside to photograph animals in the meadow. “I used to ride horses, when I was a young teenager myself, but I had to quit,” she says. “When I discovered Instagram I started photographing nature. I came across the enjoyment of photographing horses by accident.”

Here are Linda’s tips for capturing these calm beings up close:

Read More

Ancient Egypt was not a mixed society.
Ancient Egypt was PITCHED BLACK until the 7th century AD, when Indo Aryans called Arabs invaded from Central Asia.
For 99 percent of Egyptian history, Egypt was as BLACK as Nigeria, as BLACK as Congo, and as BLACK as Senegal.
King Tut was a dark skinned black man,
Queen Tiye was a beautiful and EXTREMELY dark skinned woman.
Hatshepsut was also very very very dark skinned.
Even during the Ptolemaic period of Kemet, the Egyptians were primarily African.
The fact that the most advanced civilization of human history was composed primarily of Black People is the most annoying and frustrating thing to white supremacist historians today.
buttart:

there’s so much going on in this gif

buttart:

there’s so much going on in this gif

(Fuente: thecatsmustbecrazy)

zantonioz:

PARED DE ESCALADA - De la que da gusto caerte http://ift.tt/1wobyvN

zantonioz:

PARED DE ESCALADA - De la que da gusto caerte http://ift.tt/1wobyvN